Safety & Technology

world's safest seat belt buckle

Learn why GWRs cantilever buckle saves more lives

A seat belt buckle serves the function of securely joining two ends of the seat belt together, not unlatching during sudden and severe loads, yet be easy for the occupant to unfasten. To understand why GWR’s cantilever buckle is the safest on the roads, it is important to understand the evolution of seat belt buckles. The first seat belt to be mass-produced in the United States in the 1950’s and 1960’s used a seat belt buckle similar to the ones still used today on commercial airplanes, called a “lift-cover” or “lift-lever” buckle. The seat belt had a male tongue at…
CRASH TESTING GWR

Seat Belt Crash Testing: you can still learn a lot from a dummy

Seat belt crash testing is one of the most effective safety strategies when designing seat belts for vehicles. The basic principle of a seat belt is very simple, as has to do with kinetic energy. When you are in a vehicle moving at 50 kph, you have a lot of kinetic energy, and after a crash, you have zero kinetic energy. The purpose of the seat belt is to help absorb that kinetic energy with the webbing around the hips and torso or rib cage, and the seat belt webbing stretches a bit so the stop is not quite so…

What is the difference between an ELR and an ALR?

Customers often ask, “what is the difference between an ELR and ALR?” They are referring to two types of retractors used in Seat Belts. An Automatic Locking Retractor (ALR) locks when the continuous motion of spooling the belt out is stopped. Once the occupant has pulled the lap belt into place and the seat belt tongue is inserted into the buckle, the ALR allows the extra seat belt webbing to retract into the retractor until the webbing is tight around the occupant’s hips and all slack in the belt is removed. At this point a bar locks into a spool…