Industry News

NHTSA’s Final Rule for seat belts on new large buses starts Nov 28, 2016

New seat belt legislation takes effect next week. NHTSA published a final rule amending Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 208, “Occupant Crash Protection” (49 CFR 571.208), requiring lap/shoulder seat belts for each passenger seating position in: (a) all new over-the-road buses (excluding school buses); and (b) in new buses other than over-the-road buses, with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) greater than 26,000 pounds (excluding school buses, transit buses, prison buses, and perimeter-seating buses). Additionally, the seat belt anchorages, both torso and lap, on passenger seats must be integrated into the seat structure, so as not to impede emergency…

Recalls: How much do they cost your company?

The biggest recall in automotive history is still making headlines, and putting a spotlight on the costs involved in a recall. The airbag recall that started in 2013 and affects cars as far back as 2002, has affected 10 different automakers: Honda, Toyota, General Motors, Fiat Chrysler, Ford, BMW, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Saab and Nissan. An estimated 34 million cars are affected in the United States, and another 7 million worldwide. There have been 139 reported injuries, with some fatalities. The costs are mounting, resulting in a potential bankruptcy for Takata, and unknown costs for the vehicle manufacturers. U.S. regulators and…

GWR supports NHTSA recommendation that lap belts be installed on all large School Buses

Currently federal regulations do not require large school buses (>10,000 pounds) to have any seat belts installed, and approximately 4 school age children (5-18 years old) who are occupants of large school buses are killed annually. It is estimated that the average incremental cost of equipping a large school bus with lap/shoulder belts without a loss in occupant capacity to be $7,346 - $10,296. While the cost of installing lap/shoulder belts can be expensive, GWR Safety Systems recommends at the very least installing two-point lap belts in every large school bus, and with GWR bus lap belts, the cost will…

Could better designed seat belts lead to higher usage rates and fewer fatalities?

Seat Belt Safety Facts in US: Could better designed seat belts lead to higher usage rates lead and fewer fatalities? The Advocates for Highway & Auto Safety stated that in 2013, 21,132 occupants of passenger vehicles were killed in motor vehicle crashes, and almost half were unrestrained at the time of the crash. In 2015, the US National Safety Council said nearly 19,000 passengers and drivers were killed in motor vehicle accidents from January to June, which is 14 percent higher than the same period in 2014. The number of motor vehicle crashes has been increasing each year since 2007,…